A Little Night Music

It’s all about the classics in this delightful evening for chamber orchestra. Let the inventive genius within the music of Bach, Haydn and Mozart strip away the February blues with a classical concoction of mathematical simplicity.

PROGRAM

EINE KLEINE NACHTMUSIK
W.A. Mozart (1756-1791)

ALLEGRO

ROMANZE

MINUETTO

RONDO

INTERMISSION

SYMPHONY NO. 101 IN D MAJOR ‘CLOCK’
F. J. Haydn (1732-1809)

ADAGIO

ANDANTE

MINUETTO, ALLEGRETTO

FINALE-VIVACE

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

Mozart’s Serenade No. 13 in G major K525 is one of the composer’s most famous and often performed chamber works. It was composed in 1787, during Mozart’s Viennese Period when he was the chamber composer to Emperor Joseph II. This was a prolific period in his life and one in which he composed some of his most relaxed and expansive chamber works, including two of his most celebrated string quintets, the K515 & 516. Oddly enough, despite the popularity of Serenades, Nachtmusik went unpublished in Mozart’s lifetime. Constanze, his wife, sold the manuscript to publishers in 1799 and it was not performed until 1827. It’s interesting to speculate on why Mozart himself did not publish the work which surely would have been popular. The mystery remains, while we enjoy the work that seems to embody Mozart and his music.

SYMPHONY 101

Franz Joseph Haydn visited London twice during the 1790s and the bustling city welcomed the celebrity composer with open arms. Londoners at the time favoured splashy entertainment, and Haydn was happy to oblige with his second set of London Symphonies, writing music with more panache than he would for a Viennese audience. Symphony 101 was begun in 1794 in Vienna, but completed it in London later that same year. Its premiere was an immediate success. Nicknamed the “Clock” after the pendulum-like beat in the andante movement this, work is a fine example of the form and structure of the classical symphonies of the time (with just a little bit of extra flair from “Poppa” Haydn).